Ventral and Umbilical Hernia

>>Ventral and Umbilical Hernia
Ventral and Umbilical Hernia2018-07-31T22:04:38+00:00

What is a Ventral Hernia?

Generally, hernias develop in the abdominal wall, where a particular area weakens and starts developing a hole or tear. Part of the intestines or abdominal tissue may push through this weakened area, resulting in potentially serious complications and severe pain.

Ventral hernias are a kind of abdominal hernia that can occur at any place on the abdominal wall. These hernias may develop due to incomplete closure of part of the abdominal wall, as a defect at birth, or develop where an incision was once made during an abdominal surgery, occurring because the incision didn’t recover properly.

Ventral hernias are a kind of abdominal hernia that can occur at any place on the abdominal wall. These hernias may develop due to incomplete closure of part of the abdominal wall, as a defect at birth, or develop where an incision was once made during an abdominal surgery, occurring because the incision didn’t recover properly.

Symptoms of Ventral Hernia

This condition can produce a number of symptoms. It may be possible that one patient feels not even a single symptom, whereas, the other suffers from severe pain. These symptoms may take many days or even months to emerge. The physician generally diagnoses a ventral hernia by monitoring the patient’s symptoms as well as studying imaging tests to find that whether there is a presence of a ventral hernia.

The symptoms may include pain or discomfort in the area of the hernia, which might worsen as you try to lift heavy objects or stand. You may feel or see a growth or bulging in the area that feels sensitive to the touch. Make sure to consult the doctor immediately if you experience any of the following symptoms.

  • Vomiting
  • Nausea
  • Mild discomfort in the abdominal area
  • Outward bulging of tissues or skin in the abdominal area
  • Pain in the abdomen

Diagnosis of Ventral Hernia

services_hernia_0The doctor will perform a physical examination for a complete diagnosis. He may need to look inside the body for ventral hernia confirmation. Following are the diagnostic tests to diagnose the ventral hernia.

  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)
  • CT (computerized tomography) scans
  • Ultrasound of the abdomen area

Complications Of Untreated Ventral Hernia

Those ventral hernias that have grown above 10 centimeters are categorized as giant ventral hernias. These hernia load the abdominal cavity, thus making it complicated to detach the hernia from the organs in the surroundings. As the size of hernia keeps on growing, the recurrence risk also increases. Here are the major complications if ventral hernia remains untreated.

  • Incarceration: This is a condition in which your intestines get trapped outside the abdomen, stopping blood supply or resulting in blockage of the intestines.
  • Strangulation: When blood to the intestines is blocked, strangulation occurs. Part of the intestines begin to decay or it may die. This may even block the bowel, thus immediate surgery is essential.

Treatment for Ventral Hernia

Ventral Hernia requires surgical correction.  The options for surgical treatment are as follows:

  • Laparoscopic removal: In this type of surgery, the surgeon makes several small openings and then fixes the hernia through the use of a small camera that helps in directing the surgery.
  • Non-laparoscopic (Open Hernia Repair): The surgeon pushes the tissue back into place by making a large opening in the body and then sew it.

What to Expect After Surgery?

You may have to spend a few nights after the surgery in the hospital. The surgery is generally safe and complications are not common. The risk of complications, such as blood clots and pneumonia is further reduced when the patient tries to get out of bed after surgery and move as soon as the doctor allows.

  • Hernia recurrence

Ventral Hernia can recur up to many years after surgery and this may cause the patient to undergo a second operation.

  • Incidence

Most of the patients suffer from ventral hernia in their 5th decade of life. Some common risk factors include obesity, diabetes, smoking, lung disease, steroids and wound infections.

Disclaimer: Information provided in this article is for general knowledge purposes only. It is, in no means, a replacement for your doctor’s advice. Please consult your doctor and surgeon with your particular case for effective treatment and recovery of your condition.